Archive for August, 2007|Monthly archive page

Read a whole graphic novel! Clubbing

Well, I’ve finally done it — read a whole graphic novel. Clubbing, by Andi (a guy) Watson and Josh Howard. I even understood most of it, even though it was “veddy, veddy” British in tone. …more…
Anniesse

This is the start of our director’s review…to see more visit MCPL’s other blog http://mcplteenspace.blogspot.com
for this and other reviews of books for teens. We hope that parents and teachers visit both
blogs and share your views on books for and about teens as well as mentioning adult fiction that you know teens may enjoy also. Reading levels are so varied and so are interests, that we find many adults interested in young adult literature – gives them that young feeling again. And, many teens are interested in fantasy, science fiction and even romance that are written for an older audience and yet tell stories that are universal in scope.

The best thing about blogging is sharing the joy of reading.
Donna

The Next Thing on My List

The Next Thing on My List by Jill Smolinski, is a novel about June Parker. June makes the acquaintance of a young girl named Marissa Jones at Weight Watchers and after offering her a ride home, they are involved in an unusual traffic accident and the girl dies. Finding the girl’s list, 20 things to do before 25, June decides to accomplish the goals for her to sort of set things right for the girl’s untimely death. The tasks range from watching a sunrise to running a 5k to kiss a stranger and on to the more serious one of change someone’s life. The list itself is interesting and I really enjoyed June’s attitude and her hopes for the mission she has chosen. Ordinary people meeting unusual circumstances have created a gently thought provoking read. What would your list be before 25? before 50? before 75? It is something to think about.
Not exactly chick lit but certainly a woman’s story.

Guys only library blog? yes

Fans of libraries – check out this latest take on sharing through blogs – http://pigskull.blogspot.com/ Scott County Public Library’s blog Pig Skull Book Club is a book discussion group for fathers and sons. “No sissy stuff” is part of its advertising. Visit and see what you think.
Donna =)
Muhlenberg Co. Public Libraries likes fathers and sons too – that’s why we will be at the Kentucky Deer Classic on August 25, 2007 at the Muhlenberg County Ag and Expo Center in Powderly. Lots of fun for the whole family: displays and workshops about hunting and of course, Miss Pockets telling Stories from the Woods.

Good Reads

At the staff meeting Tuesday morning, Director Anniesse Williams introduced us to a new blog and so I had to go – and join the www.goodreads.com website. A place to share reviews with friends, you do not have to have gmail or whatever and you can read about what other people are reading all over. It is neat, but please post here for your Muhlenberg Co. friends, books that you have checked out from the library! Hope to see you both places, donna =)

Back on Blossom Street

Debbie Macomber has once again displayed her gift for telling heartwarming stories of families and friends working through life’s ordinary problems. Back on Blossom Street follows The Shop on Blossom Street and A Good Yarn as part of a trilogy. Well, I just picked it up as a new book and I did not jump back and get the other two first, and I still enjoyed it. I do believe this is one set that I would like to have read in order though.
The shop’s owner Lydia Hoffman, a youthful cancer survivor, in the first story goes through a lot of changes and forges relationships that would have been better in chronological order. But not one to miss out on the details, I enjoyed three so much I now have checked out the first book and hope to finish it soon and move on to the second one. The story of Lydia, her sister Margaret and the knitting class members, Jacqueline, Carol and Alix provide that feeling of visiting an old neighborhood which I think makes a very comforting read. Compassion, caring, and the little details of life that upset us and bring us joy are truly gifts in the words of a Debbie Macomber novel.